Jun 7, 2012

Born to Eat - 2, BMI Breakdown and the Kid's Coo Coo for Curry

BMI Breakdown
The first stanza confirmed smoking and mowing 40 oz. malt liquors are healthier than obesity.  Go to your local Piggly Wiggly, scoop up 100 grown-ups and 70 of them will be overweight or obese.  Only 30% of adults in America are within the healthy weight range.

Unless you're a body builder, pregnant or a pregnant body builder, a person is generally considered overweight when the body mass index (BMI) hits 25.  A BMI greater than 30 punches your ticket to the obesity club.

BMI is a simple calculation of body fat based on weight and height.  Do you know what your BMI is?  To find out, spin the scale (no cheating), then measure how tall you are in inches.  Boot up the Casio solar calculator, the formula goes like this:

(weight x 708) / height" / height"

Let's say, hypothetically of course, one has a pale scrawny frame of 142 pounds and 71".  The Casio cranks the BMI damage:

      142 lbs x 708 = 100536
      100536 / 71" = 1416
      1416 / 71" =  19.9 BMI

We know what needs to be done to trim down, just a matter of getting it done.  And remember, cutting calories grinds weight faster than exercise, especially for women.  Combine the two to hasten the restoration of your youth.

Not only should parents work to stay in shape, we are responsible for keeping our children in the healthy weight zone. 

Pigtails' Coo Coo for Curry
I introduce my daughter to a wide variety of food.  This is key to getting the girl trotting down the path of a lifetime of healthy eats.

I've shaped her taste buds to sing when they touch avocados, hummus, black beans, grilled cod, wild rice, tuna wraps, peas in the pod, sliced green peppers, raw apples, yogurts (5 a week), milk and green tea.  We're no fools, we ease up and get greasy on weekends:  monster 'loins and seared chuck.

Every so often, her mouse voice begs not for McD's but:  "Daddy, I'm craving A-Dong vegetable spring rolls" or "can we do Indian curry for lunch?"

Tots exposed (not forced) to diverse dishes will learn to appreciate funky fodder, be less picky on their plate, and have a healthy dance with food when they move out on their own.

I'm annoyed when parents say they're too busy to cook or exclusively feed their little ones mac 'n' cheese, pizza rolls and PB&J.  That's sad.  They are scheduling junior for a wresting match with the scale in 20 years. 

I see adults eating like kids, thumbing their nose at everything but the blandest of bites.  Maybe their parents didn't branch their meals.  Are picky folks apt to struggle with the belt leaving tight red marks around the waist?  

SpaghettiOs suck, feed kids nutritious adult meals.

Loose Buds, Lower BMI
So why start the post on BMI and end with kids crazy for curry?  Because they are linked together.  Speaking out of my buttocks here with no scientific data to back it, here is my observation:
  • Brats raised mostly on junk food are more likely to be picky eaters as adults.
  • Parents that rarely cook eat out more.  Kids often eat less healthy when doing take-out*, especially if frequenting fast foods.     *Subway and Jared get a pass.
  • Adult picky eaters are more likely to have difficulty maintaining weight, ingesting too much of the junky stuff and too little of the good vittles.  Filled on empty carbs, salt and fat while shunning vitamins and nutrients, thee body is getting one-two punched.  Gaining weight even as it starves for what it really needs.
  • Adult picky eaters on average may having a higher BMI than non-picky eaters.
  • Adult picky eaters may perpetuate the pattern of fussiness with their offspring.
  • The cycle continues. 

 --------
Agree or disagree?


-Beard

49 comments:

  1. Anonymous6/07/2012

    Interesting ideas here.

    I was a VERY picky eater growing up. We also dined out a fair amount (my parents worked at home, so that was a way for them to get out of the house). My dad use to tell me to try all of the foods again when I hit my 20s because my taste buds would change. I went to college, moved across the country a few times and tried a LOT of new foods. Don't tell my dad, but he was right - I like a lot of things I use to hate. I'm still not wild about fish though.

    Your thoughts on picky eaters and relation to BMI are interesting. I think though (also with no scientific data to back this up) that it has less to do with what we are eating, and more to do with how much. I think as a society we've grown use to large portion sizes, and were always told to clean out plates.

    Of course, we are completely ignoring the genetics/age issue here and how metabolism is affected by these...

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    1. Good points, I haven't hit on portion control yet in the series, but it's coming. Our acceptance of what is a normal sized meal has shifted over time. Remember growing up when a 16 oz. Coke seemed large? Now, the big drinks start at 32 oz. and tap out at what, 80 ounces?

      On your point about amount that we eat is as important as what we eat, I'd agree that you can stay within a healthy weight range eating only junk food if you stay in the calorie bank and don't take in more than you burn. But where the junk food nails you is on the internals, it can jack up your cholesterol and mess with your sugar levels if not careful.

      Genetics and age do play a factor as you mention, some people have a higher resting metabolism than others, and we need fewer calories as we age. Once we get into a pattern of eating large portions, it's tough to scale back as our metabolism slows over time.

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  2. I grew up with a mother who hated fresh fruits, vegetables and spices. We ate salad and dad would bring home grapes and bananas but that was it until I left home and got married (all in the same day) There are still some things I haven't been able to develop a taste for.

    I started the kids at an early age on broccoli, zucchini,all types of fresh fruit, yogurt and food with an actual FLAVOR. They are both in their 20's, adventurous eaters and at a perfect weight.

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    1. Nice job of breaking the cycle, LMSS!

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  3. I used to be a picky eater as a child, but my parents always ate superbly (they love to cook and always research their restaurants extensively when on vacation before trying them out). Even as a picky eater, however, I ate well. My meals were simple, yeah, but definitely not unhealthy. Also, you'd be surprised at how unhealthily people are starting to eat here in Spain...
    Oh and I'm a big fan of the "you can eat 'junk' food if you made it" lemma i.e. you can eat french fries/cake/cookies/burger/chicken nuggets/etc if you made them yourself, from scratch.

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    1. "Oh and I'm a big fan of the "you can eat 'junk' food if you made it"

      That line works for me, BRING ON THE MADE-FROM-SCRATCH DOUBLE-FUDGE BUNDT CAKE! :-)

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  4. BMI is a good indicator, but it doesn't tell the whole story. I'm in the overweight range, but exercise regularly and pre-baby did marathons (working on building up again, although maybe not to marathon level!). Also, my recent cholesterol and other blood tests were perfect. In fact, I had forgotten to fast before getting the blood taken and my doctor started laughing when I told him, said that if my cholesterol was that low after food then I had nothing to worry about.

    I like your point about introducing kids to good food young. There's a new weaning method called Baby Led, which we've been doing. My little girl's had no mush, and no spoon held by anyone but herself (she's still getting that one down!). Last night she (9 months old) had what the grown-ups ate: w.w. ziti topped with sauteed mushrooms, onions, garlic, and zucchini, flavored with basil and a touch of chili. We'll see how it goes when she hits toddlerdom and develops more of a mind of her own.

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    1. BMI is not bullet-proof, one of my running friends is near the overweight range with his BMI number. He's fit, but thick, definitely healthy in my book.

      My BMI number is good, but cholesterol numbers not so hot. I tend to think this is more DNA than dining, as we eat healthy most of the time and workout plenty.

      Checking out the Baby Led site that you mentioned, I like their approach. My next post on this series will about my support for babies drinking mom's milk.

      Your ziti mushroom dinner is making me hungry!

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    2. I want to politely disagree. :) I think we all agree that BMI is NOT a perfect indicator of overall health. (We can all name super skinny folks who survive on twinkies and french fries.) However, I disagree that one can still be at a healthy weight when that weight is outside of the BMI "normal" levels. (I am including body builders here. Muscle is VERY important, but too much muscle puts a huge strain on the heart and cardiovascular system.)

      In fact, I think the BMI chart is very generous. I'll use myself as an example. At my height (5ft 2in) I could weigh up to 136lbs without being overweight. That would not be healthy. I have weighed that much before, so I know. I currently weigh 117lbs and this weight is still a little heavy for my frame. (I'm nursing a 13 month old and I carry about 10 extra pounds while nursing that falls off when I stop.) Dr. John McDougall's research of indigenous peoples who have virtually no degenerative diseases shows that these peoples are all very thin. Most people would probably even say too thin! But, again, they are healthy with very little degenerative disease. Other researchers have come to similar conclusions.

      I'm not advocating the anorexic model look, but to be the healthiest you can be and to prevent disease, I believe a body weight at the mid/low end of the BMI normal range, coupled with a healthy diet, regular exercise, etc. is best.

      Just my 2 cents.

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  5. Debbie6/08/2012

    19.18 woo-hoo, not bad for my 42 yr old self. i had the revese problem, my kid ate nothing but homecooking & hand packed lunches every day, but now that shes a 22 yr old adult (yah, i had her young) she is the worlds pickiest eater. so many things she doesnt like that she loved & craved as a kid. went all vegan strange on me. but shes an adult so shes free to make these choices. & as her mother i am also free to buy her industrial sized bottles of multi vitamins.

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  6. Jenn W6/08/2012

    Disagree on the BMI, while it can be a decent indicator, it does not take into account those of us who are really atheletic with lots of muscle. I absolutely agree about your thoughts on food though. My mum gave us fruits and veggies for snacks growing up, our plates always had more veggies and whole grains than other stuff and she made everything in our house from scratch. We were also required to give every new dish/food a fair try. These eating habits are so ingrained that to this day I eat the same way and when I want a snack, I always reach for a piece of fruit or some veggies. You're smart to establish good eating habits with your daughter when she's young.

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    1. I hinted in the post at BMI not always being accurate: "Unless you're a body builder...". It will spit out a higher number for those that are cut thicker. For the general population though, BMI tells a true story.

      Crossing fingers the eating habits I'm working to establish with my daughter will stick when she's out on her own. It takes extra effort to keep the variety up and nutrients in place, I hope she thinks it worth it to do the same in 10 years on her own.

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  7. Dsmama6/08/2012

    Love the post! I have a 2 year old and we started her on veggies as soon as it was an option. Surprisingly her favorite is asparagus! We also got a plot at one of the community gardens here locally so her lil pudgy toddler hands help plant, water & harvest the bounties.

    I grew up in a family with 2 obese parents - in fact my mom has had her stomach stapled twice and within the last 10 years she had a gastric bypass. Seeing her struggle with her weight my entire life has been a learning experience and continues to motivate me to be as healthy as possible today. I have found the exercise that works for me - a combination of yoga and intense cycling.

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    1. Howdy, stranger, glad to hear your daughter digs asparagus. Yum on that with a little olive oil and striped on the grill for a few minutes. The garden plots behind the Franklin library look amazing, puts my little backyard plot to shame.

      Thank you for seeing the benefit in staying fit yourself and introducing your family to healthy food choices, makes me smile!

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    2. Dsmama6/08/2012

      Watch out! I finally got a smart phone so I can comment whenever & wherever I choose so you'll be seeing more comments from me! I check your blog every day.

      Look for us at those Franklin plots!

      Delete
  8. I'm not as trim as I'd like to be (though my BMI is still normal), and I do attribute some of it to unhealthy eating habits formed when I was younger. Mom raised us alone for about half of my childhood and as a result, we helped get dinner started with easy (but not terribly healthy) stuff like Hamburger Helper. I'm trying to break the cycle now with my own 16 month old daughter, feeding her lots of fruits and veggies (and eating more of them myself). My sister-in-law looks at me like I'm crazy when I give my daughter avocado or asparagus or tofu, and then complains that her own son will only eat pizza, french fries, and chicken nuggets. Meanwhile, my daughter has never had McDonald's, and probably won't until she's old enough to buy it on her own. Hopefully she'll have no interest in it.

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    1. My kid doesn't like everything, but I have her try things at least twice. A few dishes she wrinkled her nose the first time, I served again a couple months later and she adjusted to it. Kids only exposed to beanie weenies and hot pockets are less apt to go for the asparagus and leafy spinach when they're out on their own.

      Thanks for putting in the effort to ensure your daughter gets the nutrition she needs.

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  9. We have exposed our children to many different types of food and, in general, will eat most anything. However, I've yet to find a way to get them to eat tofu (short of forcing it). We still serve it and insist the children try it, but that's about it. That being said, they still beg for the golden arches-sigh.

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    1. I personally don't think tofu is terribly terrific, I'll eat it if served in a dish, but don't often cook with it. I'm a fan of exposing kids many different foods, but not forcing it. And I may have once told my kid a chunk of fish was chicken, she gobbled it up.

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  10. AGREE!!!!! We constantly get comments on how well our 6 and 4 year old eat. Um, it's 'cause dinner is made in our own kitchen every night and they have the same thing in front of them as we do. What a concept. Of course there are things they don't care for. And those things change as their tastebuds change, but the day will never come when I set a pile of "kid food" in front of them while The Dad and I devour our real food. Ridiculous.
    I seriously get fired up when I hear people say "All my kid will eat is....." Or, "Oh, my kid would never eat that." Really? Where did they get the idea that pizza, nuggets, spaghettiO's, lunchables, etc, was an option in the first place?! And no, they won't eat it, because you've said over and over in front of them that they won't like it.
    It just blows my mind, the lack of common sense. I can't count how many times we've been to someone's house for dinner where they've made a separate meal for the kids. Again, ridiculous. And now I'm all fired up about it again. LOL Great post. :)

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    1. Right on, sister!

      I certainly don't want to enable a high maintenance kid that expects her own special meal while I gnaw a smoked salmon. I make one meal with a wide variety of flavors, tell her to eat as she wishes, and no snacks before bed. It works, she knows she'll be hungry if she doesn't dig in.

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    2. Chiming in late -- but gotta give Mindy 2 thumbs up for her comments. I don't have kids, but have seen relatives/friends do the "separate meal for kids" thing many times, or recommend it for parties. I definitely do not agree; my approach is serve a good variety of homemade foods and let the kids try them/figure out what they like. Sorry, I won't be catering chicken McNuggets or cooking frozen pizzas for the kiddies, because that's not stuff we buy nor want any leftovers of.

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  11. My mothers plan on losing/controlling her weight was smoking 3 packs a day and drinking healthy TAB (insert the sarcasm). Being raised by my grandmother , (Thank God) I ate healthy and homemade. I think its all key to start young with children. If its all thats there (pantry and meals) kids will love it! My girls beg for black beans in their turkey burgers...and I'm happy go oblige. Great post...BTW

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    1. Ha, the "smoking Camels and Tab cola" weight loss program, probably as effective as Atkins. What ever happened to Tab?

      You're right, kids will generally learn to accept the food made available to them. If they are fed junk, then junk food is normal to them. If you feed them green leafy stuff, they'll think that is normal and dig in. They may not like everything on the plate, but at least I've tried to open her her up to what's available.

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  12. Anonymous6/08/2012

    Disagree. I was overweight in highschool, only eating my moms wholesome homecooked meals (which always included vegetables/fruits that we were required to "atleast try", if not enjoy.) I was and still am a picky eater. I will try new things, but havent and wont eat some of the basics: lettuce, citrus, blueberries, asparagus, etc.

    In college and since, having control of my own food, I ate/eat junk food (and lots of soda) all the time, but less of it and I exercise more. I've been away from home about 8 years now, married almost 2, and only very recently cooked fresh broccoli for the first time. my husband and I enjoy eating out and do so often (plus we work full time, so its hard to find time to cook). I find that I'm happier when I eat what I want, and I lost a lot weight initially, then have been pretty steady at the same lower weight since (which would fall into the normal category above). I ran a half marathon a few years ago, and would regularly eat double stuff oreos and taco bell before my practice runs. I think more than WHAT you eat, it matters how MUCH... and exercising helps too.

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    1. Anonymous6/08/2012

      oh, I guess that was poorly phrased. by "less of it" I mean, less food total, but a higher proportion of it is junk.

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    2. I'll write a post on portion size, it's a factor in the BMI mix.

      A person will lose weight on junk food if they consume fewer calories than they burn.
      A person will gain weight on healthy food if they consume more calories than they burn.

      The difference is blood pressure and blood work for a person eating junk food vs. healthy food may show a different picture.

      What you eat affects blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure and immune system strength. BMI doesn't tell the entire store, a person eating mostly empty carbs could be in the normal BMI zone but find they have high cholesterol or blood sugar. Their body may also be starving for vitamins and minerals, which affect how your skin and hair look, resistance to getting sick and generally how you feel overall.

      Metabolism slows as we age, which means we need fewer calories over time. Junk food generally packs more calories per serving, so you may find that while maintaining weight on junk food works now, it may not after age 40.

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    3. Anonymous6/12/2012

      I wasn't trying to advocate junk food as a weight loss plan, I was just pointing out that eating "healthy" or diverse food alone is not enough to ensure a healthy BMI (eating habits make a huge difference), nor will it necessarily produce non-picky eaters.

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  13. Only thing I have to say is in regard to kids and their "palate"....diversity doesn't always breed a finer palate. I have 3 kids, all of them exposed to the same healthy foods of all ethnic varieties from Armenian to Tunisian. You name it, it has probably been eaten in our house. Yet somehow we have still ended up with one uber picky child who if left to her own devices would subsist on yogurt and bagels. Annoying? Extremely! Especially when the other kids (2 and 15) are tucking into Pad Thai, Curry, you name it and our little bland foodie is refusing dinner.

    I always used to think, "I am glad I am not one of those chicken nugget parents...". But now that I have one of those picky kids, I have learned sometimes you work with what you have and judge less. It has been a wonderful learning experience for me and for her! While I can't make her eat, she also can't stop me from putting healthy, diverse options on her plate. She knows the kitchen closes at 7pm and breakfast is at 7am. We always end dinner with "Are you full enough until breakfast?" Sometimes she is, and sometimes she will grudgingly try a few bites of something on her plate. And with that the cold war continues at our house with victories and minor skirmishes.

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    1. My rules for daughter at dinnertime are simple:

      You will try try everything on your plate.
      I am not making you a special meal, unless it's your birthday. She once asked for smoked salmon, I hickory-smoke it out back.
      If you choose to not eat, you choose to go to bed hungry.

      This works well for us. The times where she's resisted a food the first time, she'll usually go for it if we try again in a month or two. Sometimes tweaking the presentation a bit to make it fun does it. I've found she's more fond of raw vegetables if I provider her a little cup of Ranch to dredge them through.

      Having her help cook the meals seems to also get her pumped up to try our masterpieces.

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    2. We have very similar rules...no short order cooking, kitchen hours are posted, if she chooses to go to bed hungry that is unfortunate because good meals are available. She will eat raw vegetables (not cooked, go figure). I just find it fascinating that out of 3 kids, 2 eat anything and normally make healthy choices when left on their own, and one super picky one. Funny how life works. On the plus side, all 3 are healthy and athletic so we must be doing something right! Just would love to see her expand her horizons a bit to match her siblings.

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  14. I agree with Delancey. It is easy to be all judgmental if you have a child/children that will continue to eat all sorts of foods as they grow older from your wonderful example. My eldest daughter was a fantastic eater until she hit 5 years old (she is 10 now). It seemed like overnight that she just decided not to eat anything! She still eats fruit thank heavens but she is reduced to broccoli, roast potatoes, sometimes raw carrots and corn in the vegie dept. We cook most meals from scratch, have lived on 4 continents and tried all the local foods etc. so it just doesn't guarantee anything. She is at a perfectly healthy weight and is very athletic so I am not worried about that but I just hope a broader palate returns some day! I just keep offering whatever we are having and, yes, I often make something separate for her because, honestly, life is too short to wage a war over the dinner table. I would rather her grow up with memories of pleasant family meals where we share and talk to each other rather than trying to force her to eat what we are eating. In the reverse our younger son was a horribly picky toddler (he would only eat 1 type of fruit for months on end despite access to a wide variety) and is now a budding foodie so I have hope that she will return to the flavour side one day! As far as the link between BMI and picky eaters? Tenuous at best I think. There are studies that show people with a higher BMI actually live longer and are healthier so I think we need to keep in mind it is a rough diagnosing tool but still a helpful guideline. I do agree that junk food dulls your taste buds though. I would be more concerned about portion size I think (way out of control here in the US). I have gone to great lengths to teach my kids to listen to their bodies and stop when they are full (something I was not taught as a child) and now have the satisfaction of seeing them put down half a chocolate bar (or cob of corn if you prefer) because they have had enough. I have had other parents look down at me for not making my kids 'clean their plate'. Anyway, that is my two cents worth!

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    1. Thanks Catherine! Being a Brit ex-pat myself sounds like our kids have had similar cuisine adventures. Lovely to know I'm not the only one with a picky kid in the mix! :). I agree with you on portion sizes which funnily I had to retrain my Yank husband on. We soldier on with our picky ones...best wishes to you!

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    2. Catherine, good advice and opinion there, I mostly agree with your response. I'll spit out a portion size post soon. A person can be in the normal BMI range by sticking to reasonable portion sizes, but still have junked up blood work if their meals are mostly fasts, sugars and salt with little nutrients.

      I think your daughter will have a healthy relationship with food, and she doesn't seem too picky if she's scarfing fruit and broccoli, carrots, tates and cobbed corn. Taste changes over time, I enjoy more foods now than I did as a kid.

      As far as studies that show those with a higher BMI live longer, that is sometimes true for those in the overweight category, but not in the obese range. More people are shifting from the overweight to the obese level. At that point, a person is 36% more likely to die than a person in the normal BMI zone. One of the theories of why those in the overweight BMI range can live longer is they are more aggressively treated for conditions that are brought on by being overweight: diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol.

      The disease factor is higher for those that are overweight, it's a quality of life thing.

      I'll take that other half of the chocolate bar your kids didn't eat!

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    3. Ha ha, I know it sounded good in writing what my daughter actually does eat but the limitations within that 4 vegie list is very specific and frustrating! Oh well, the salads will still be served until she is willing to try them again some day. I do get the whole link between the BMI, obesity and these problems but I am just not convinced on the link with picky eating specifically. I would still look at other things first like portion size and the consumption of processed foods. My grandmother has a higher BMI (not obese though), but throughout her life did not eat a wide variety of foods (very basic but homemade and unprocessed) and she is still rocking it at 104. Obviously, this is only one example but I have definitely seen more problems arising in my formerly robust family tree the further we get from the farm and are consuming more processed foods. I think it is harder to eat healthier when you live in an urban environment but definitely worth the effort.

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    4. 104, crap, I'm going to start eating what your grandmother chows on. My family tends to peter out around age 75, so I'm aiming for 76.

      You're right about sticking to non-processed foods. That's also on my post list for this topic, and I hinted at keeping it fresh and local on the rings thread. It takes extra effort to whip meals from scratch, I'm not so sure families are generally interested in investing the time for health. The way I see it is pay your dues now or later. I've decided to pay them now through workouts and healthy eats (intermingled occasionally with bacon cheeseburgers and ice-cream).

      Thanks for deciding it worth the effort to serve your family nutritious plates. :-)

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  15. I agree.

    Exposure is a huge issue I think, one that not everyone is fortune to get. I think having a garden is massive for not having picky eaters. I have super young kids and they LOVE vegetables because they have helped create and nurture them from the ground up (and garden veggies just taste better!). The nearest curry place to me is an hour and a half, but we make it at home :)

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    1. That's almost a post right there: Having the kiddos help plant and harvest the garden gets them more interested in trying the vegetables they produced. It works at the grocery store too. Allowing them to pick out healthy bites seems to get them fired up to try them at home. Simple and effective, make it fun and not a fight.

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  16. Anonymous6/10/2012

    Agree.

    ~ SuziQ

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  17. Also being a picky eater can also be a method of staying in control. Having worked in schools and with a lot of kids in my neighborhood, I'm intrigued by the those who won't try what's offered, or try a new game, or really do anything that requires trying something new that requires being flexible. Recently a 14 year old in my neighborhood started to try all the foods that his parents had been begging him to try for years. He did and likes eating a wider variety now. Whew! He has been able to explain that he didn't like all the different textures that new foods brought to his mouth. He is also a child who had only been able to play a game by set rules with no changes, basically impossible for cul de sac kick ball. Now he's more flexible there as well. The key, to me, is that his parents didn't give up and let him eat only boxed mac and cheese. He always had 12 leaves of lettuce to eat as well!

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    1. Agree, we can't force brats to go batty over Brussels sprouts, but parents are responsible for at least plating up a heap of healthy choices so kids have the opportunity to experience it and decide.

      I'm annoyed when parents fail to provide their children with diverse, healthy options, then complain their kids are picky and only want pepperoni Hot Pockets. How can there not be a link between the "I'm too busy to cook" mentality and the rising obesity rate of kids? I call bull crap/lazy on that excuse. If a single dad can find time to cook healthy meals, so can nearly everyone. /end rant/

      The story about your 14 year old neighbor treating food in the same way he tackles a strict-rules game is interesting and not something I'd made the connection on. It makes sense that it could be a control issue as you say. Flexibility, FTW.

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  18. Anonymous6/10/2012

    I love that threads like these gets the dialogue flowing. BMI is a decent way to take that initial pulse. But I agree that everything from exposure to variety, portion control, minimizing processed foods, and integrating a healthy (and sustainable) dose of activity in one's day is the right mix to get it right. Throw in the occasional treat once in a while and it will truly feel special (as opposed to that being the norm).

    I've had my fill of moments at each end of the spectrum, but if I'm being honest with myself, when I eat healthier, I just feel better and have tons more energy and positivity in my day. It's well worth it. :)

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    1. "But I agree that everything from exposure to variety, portion control, minimizing processed foods..."

      You forgot to mention the shake weight as a key factor in the portfolio of healthiness.

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    2. Anonymous6/11/2012

      If it were only that easy...

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  19. My parents were great about making sure we ate healthy, home cooked meals. There was no such thing as "kids food" in our house. Unfortunately, I still ended up a picky eater despite their attempts! I'm not a big fan of sweets (especially on meats) or anything too spicy/flavorful.

    This picky eating killed me around Junior year of college though. I went from 6'6" and 155lbs in high school to almost 250lbs at 30. Even knowing how bad it is, it's very, very difficult to get into good eating habits so I hope your post saves someone a lot of frustration later on in life.

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    1. Teaching the fruit of my loins to stay away from smoking doesn't guarantee she'll never burn Camels. Same is true for food, it's too early to tell if my efforts to treat her to flavor will result in her being open to all foods and preferring the nutritious plates. My job is to do what I can to get her on the right track, it'll be up to her to decide if she'll continue when she's 18. I sleep well knowing there won't be regrets on my end.

      If you're age 30 and motate cutting portions and add cardio'/lifting, you should be able to lose 10 - 15 pounds a month. The BMI calculator puts "ideal weight" (whatever that means) for 6'6" at 194, so burning 55 pounds in 6 months is doable.

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  20. so very true! we must feed our kiddos nutritious foods & hopefully, one day, they will enjoy them as much as some adults do (me, for example!).

    http://ohhhsolovely.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thank you, we are responsible for doing our job of making food fun and healthy for kids, it's be up to them to carry the torch when they sail off. I get miffed at parents that don't even try and assume plain starch is all kiddos will eat.

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Thanks for the note, check back for my response!