Apr 2, 2015

Writing > Reading

Curls disagrees, but I believe reading is important, writing is even better.  Creating > consuming.

Discuss.

23 comments:

  1. Margaret4/02/2015

    I'd probably side with Curls.... just because I'm naturally a consumer and not a creator. And I'd rather not put out blood, sweat, and tears to create a mediocre product when there are so many other people doing it better. I would rather concentrate on my areas of strength (teaching, creating a good home for my family, church ministry) and then read, read, read in my free time. Now, in general however, I agree that everyone should create/produce in some way instead of being a total consumer. My "producing" is to serve, help, and do... not write.

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    1. Agree, one of out fundamental purposes in life is to create. Children, ideas, inventions, other.

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    2. Anonymous4/02/2015

      Both equally important. I see the benefits of writing more in the process itself, however. Writing, to me, is therapeutic. Often the problems I have will work themselves out as I process them through writing. Very few people actually read my writing, but I'm not sure that is the main point of the writing process. Reading is incredibly important as well. How can we learn from others if we do not read? Reading is fundamental to connecting with others.

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  2. Generally speaking, they're both equally important in different ways. Writing helps you remember and later recall information. Creatively, however, writing is probably only important to a writer (which I am). Reading seems much more universal.

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  3. Anonymous4/03/2015

    When you read, you learn about others. When you write, you learn about yourself.

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  4. Equally important, to me.

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  5. Neither is greater in general, though one may be moreso for an individual. Certainly writers NEED to write. But as Anapolady said - reading is universal, everyone can benefit from it. And to add to what Anonymous said, I believe reading helps you learn about yourself in infinite ways.

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  6. Interesting thought, but in my humble opinion, the question of writing > reading (or vice versa) is too simplistic.

    From a writer’s perspective, pouring labor into a work with little expectation that it would be “consumed” (much less considered, discussed, built upon) seems far less satisfying than to think s/he might have some small impact on a future reader, even if there might be only one. Why do we write? To express, to educate, to inspire, to inform, to influence, to share, to purge, to entertain... the list is long. Some Writers may write only for themselves and that is fine… but the basic need for some human interaction I think calls for Readers who engage with the Writers’ creations.

    Reading requires something to have been written; reading for education, illumination, satisfaction requires finding something written with some degree of quality. Beyond simply consuming the Writers’ work, though, reading also provides the opportunity for discourse: building upon ideas, providing clarity, offering differing theories or opinions, sharing insights and feelings. And in this way, the Reader creates something that is also of value.

    Though I enjoy writing (I sometimes consider myself a frustrated creator who has yet to find her niche), my greater personal enjoyment between the two lies in reading. Over a span of several years, the members of the informal book club to which I belong have forged amazing relationships. These connections may have been born over novels, but have expanded to something far greater. In that way, the writing we enjoy (or not, depending on the book!) provided the initial basis for the relationships, but the reading itself has created something very important in our lives.

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    1. And to add just one other thought... in general, I do agree that creating is important. It's the act of finding and using one's talents and resources to create, and positively contribute to society, that I find most inspirational.
      That might look different for different individuals, depending on individual talents and resources.

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  7. What a fabulous discussion thread! However, I believe too simplistic a question (as already stated above). For me, they are both equally important, in their own ways. One cannot exist without the other. Even if you only write for yourself, it is assumed that you would then read that writing. Of the two, I am a reader. Writing only for practical reasons not creatively. My personal creativity comes in other forms, growing & nurturing family and a home, dreaming/planning and arts & crafts.

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  8. Anonymous7/06/2015

    How to write good:
    1) Avoid Alliteration. Always.
    2) Prepositions are not good words to end sentences with.
    3) Avoid cliches like the plague. They're old hat.
    4) Comparisons are as bad as cliches.
    5) Be more or less specific.
    6) Writers should never generalize.
    Seven - Be consistent.
    8) Don't be redundant; don't use more words that necessary; it's highly superfluous.
    9) Who needs rhetorical questions?
    10) Exaggeration is a billion times worse than understatement.

    Where is Beard? We need some more epic tales.

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    1. Yes, where are you Beard? We miss you, Pigtails and Curls!

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    2. Very well, pick a topic and so shall it be done!

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    3. I don't need epic tales, I would just love a life update! What's new? Any big changes in life or around the house? Whatever came of the bathroom makeover? Are you guys wedding planning? Did you buy a different ring? (I remember seeing something in the comments about a different ring) How is Pigtails? Just fill us in... =)

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  9. Rachael7/17/2015

    I can't think of a good topic - just wanted to say that I've missed you. And I bet I'm not alone in feeling that way. :)

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  10. Anonymous8/09/2015

    Let's see....did I miss the front door being painted blue? What about that land? Did you buy it? Are you building or did you scrap those plans? What about those bathroom plans, what became of that debate? And then you left us hanging with the wonderful news of the engagement!

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  11. I agree with Anonymous and Arlene's suggestions..Please update us when you have a minute..Thank you!

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  12. Come back, Beard! You, Pigtails, and Curls are missed!

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  13. Rachael9/12/2015

    Beard? If you don't want to do this anymore it's okay, but you should probably let us know one way or the other. If this is simply an extended leave of absence, that's okay too but please check in so we know everything is all right.

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  14. I'll be back! 😎

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  15. I'm just glad I'm not holding my breath waiting for Beard to return. Why is he being so disrespectful to us?

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  16. Anonymous12/09/2015

    I imagine Beard is just busy, and priorities shift with big life changes (as they should). We'll welcome you whenever you want to return, Beard!
    In the meantime, looks like the spammers have started taking advantage of your page. :(

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  17. Happy New Year !! So I popped by (since I have more spare time at the moment on Summer holidays in AU) to see what's going on here. Wowsers!! Some commenters get very invested. To anyone who might be interested, have a look around this page (like I did) see what's new... up there on the right ^, I noticed a Facebook link "find us on Facebook". I'm not on Facebook but it's always worth checking out if pages are public, if you have an interest. Well, what did I find on Beard & Pigtails Facebook ??? Go check it out, you might be surprised, you might stay awhile. BEARD & CURLS : Congratulations!! Looks like you had a great day in September. My wedding anniversary is 9/9/2000 ! So much smiling, so much beauty. And Pigtails is as gorgeous as ever!

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Thanks for the note, check back for my response!